DOING BUSINESS: Quote Costs Up Front to Boost Patient Satisfaction

DOING BUSINESS

Quote Costs Up Front to Boost Patient Satisfaction

Improve case volume and collections with an effective quoting process



Doing Business

Calculating a patient’s out-of-pocket cost share requires a combination of data from different sources.

DOING BUSINESS

Quote Costs Up Front to Boost Patient Satisfaction

Improve case volume and collections with an effective quoting process

Patients are increasingly shopping for the health care services they need and becoming more aware of the cost of that care, especially for their portion of the cost. As low-cost, high-quality providers, ASCs should encourage this trend.

 


To read this article, you have to be a member of ASCA or subscribe to ASC Focus magazine.

Already a member or subscriber? Log in.

To become a member, click here. To subscribe to ASC Focus, click here.

Continue Reading Below
Continue Reading Below

Tracking and Improvement

My experience working with provider organizations has shown me that any process improvement initiative must have clear objectives, executive and board sponsorship, buy-in from staff, a means of tracking activities and a feedback process for measuring results. If we apply these to an ASC quoting process, the following would make worthwhile goals:

  • All prospective patients, regardless of insurance, will be provided with cost information in an understandable format, in advance of scheduling or treatment.
  • Engage affiliated provider organizations in this process, hopefully finding champions willing to support objectives. Share information with them proactively and retroactively.
  • Establish a system of tracking the quotes produced and communications with patients.
  • Measure improvements in financial or patient loyalty metrics and anecdotal feedback and stories.
  • Meet periodically to review results and improve processes as well as recognize and celebrate successes.

The Payoff

Through the development of a quoting program, ASCs can take a leadership role in their local markets by establishing cost transparency while providing patients with a better financial experience. This could result in improved patient and surgeon loyalty, increased case volume, improved financial results and compliance with consumer protection laws. Change presents opportunity, and higher patient financial responsibility is likely here to stay. ASCs need to adapt accordingly.


Scott Palmer is chief executive officer for Clariti Health in Branford, Connecticut. Write him at scott.palmer@clariti-health.com.

The advice and opinions expressed in this column are those of the author and do not represent official Ambulatory Surgery Center Association policy or opinion.